Ken Haman

Ken Haman

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As desktop publishing has become less and less expensive and more advisors are building brochures to advertise their practices, marketing organizations are encouraging teams to articulate their value proposition to the marketplace. Here are two glaring errors that advisors must avoid.
For a variety of reasons, there is often far too much fluff and hyperbole in the language being used to describe the typical advisory practice. Follow these guidelines to improve your marketing language.
Is your marketing material as effective as it could be? Here are some basic guidelines to help improve your message and practice brochure.
Time and energy are an advisor's two scarcest resources. Adding performance goals helps allocate these resources and transforms a business plan into a living document that can meaningfully contribute to greater success.
Working with clients can be difficult. You need to balance rational tasks of navigating capital markets with non-rational challenges of managing client emotions. In many ways, navigating client behavior is more complicated than navigating capital markets, since human emotions can swing wildly and less predictably. Check out some helpful ways to stay ahead of the curve.
Driven by difficult market conditions and higher levels of anxiety among investors, the question of whether or not advisors are "stealing" client has been coming up more frequently in the past few years. The overall growth rate for advisory practices has been stagnant for a decade, which is pushing sales management to scrutinize who is growing and why.
Advisors with growing practices quickly realize that it’s helpful to pass as many tasks to a strong support team. Ken Haman offers some practical insights and suggestions for how you can more efficiently develop a great support team and then manage their focus on deliverables.
If you’re like most advisors, plan growth is one of your highest priorities. However, for many, growing a business is an elusive dream or a worst nightmare. The typical advisor spends very little time on outreach, relying instead on referrals or direct-to-plan-sponsor marketing. Ken Haman writes that this “brute force” marketing worked in the past, but plan sponsors have become increasingly unresponsive to it.
Many financial advisors struggle with the issue of efficiency and complain they simply don’t have enough time to execute new ideas in their practice because they are so busy managing clients. Ken Haman says advisors spend too much time responding to incoming telephone calls from clients—in fact, prioritizing the demands of various clients above their own business priorities. Its time for all of that to change.
As advisors, we work in a disciplined world of risk management and probabilities, while our clients rely on feelings and “gut” decisions all day long. We shouldn’t take our discipline for granted. We need to remember the vulnerabilities that lurk in the hard-wiring of the human central nervous system.
There are certain common traits and behavioral patterns of the more effective advisors, according to blogger Ken Haman. Of course, not all advisors demonstrate every one of these characteristics, but most of the highly successful people he's been privileged to work with exhibit at least several.
Client advisory boards are a great way to get clients and advocates even more engaged in supporting the business. If you are considering developing an advisory board, here are some points to consider from blogger Ken Haman.
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