UBS, Lincoln, Neb.
Production: $5.22m
AUM $721.69m

Jonathan Beukelman's clients are mostly people who are in his parents' generation. But on any given day, he's likely to be talking about money with someone his own age, or even a high school student. "Rather than just preparing money for kids, we believe you also have to prepare the kids for the money," he says.

The Lincoln, Neb.-based financial advisor and his team spend 20 hours a week with clients' children to teach them how to make good decisions with money. After getting a clients' blessing, "we dig into the details of how the kids perceive things related to a host of issues, including financial ones," he says.

Beukelman fell in love with financial planning—and his future wife—at a college class taught by a former financial advisor. He and his wife received their Series 7 certifications before they graduated from Taylor University and went on to practice afterward. Mrs. Beukelman bowed out when the couple started a family.

Beukelman's career took off when a local executive responded to a cold call by inviting him to his office. The executive explained what Beukelman needed to know to become a good advisor. "He helped me understand the differences between the training program of the firm and the realities of what people deal with," he says. That helped him win the executive as a client (eventually), and it helped him ask better questions of all future clients.

Every year, Beukelman's five-person firm follows a review protocol for each of its 50 client families' portfolios. They spend the first quarter on financial planning, the second quarter on investments, the third on estate planning and the fourth on tax efficiency issues. But service always comes before investment advice. "We make money by sitting down and figuring out what clients need to do to get to their goal with the least amount of risk."