How to decide the right time for retirement
A retired military service man would be better off delaying his Social Security benefit until he reaches the age of 67 to boost the monthly benefit rate, according to this Q&A article from the Los Angeles Times. The retiree collects a sizeable military pension and a retiree health insurance. If he plans to work after retirement, deferring the benefit would enable him to avoid the earnings test that could reduce his monthly benefit payouts.

Social Security checks (Bloomberg News)

Hiring older workers is suddenly in season
More employers are increasingly becoming more open to making seasonal jobs into a year-round work and hiring retirees on a part-time basis, according to this article on Forbes. The shift in hiring attitude could be attributed to the low unemployment rate of 4.1%, which, according to an analyst, affects the labor market "big time!” The expert adds: “It’s difficult to find good workers right now.”

Your clients may not saving enough for retirement—and that’s OK
Clients should not lose heart if they don't save enough for retirement based on suggested savings goals, according to this article on CNBC. These savings targets are based on certain assumptions about salary, inflation and investment returns that do not apply to all clients. "For instance, they'll assume that you're starting with zero savings, but what if you have negative savings because of your student loan debt?" asks Wade Pfau, professor of retirement income at The American College.

3 ways to have a happy retirement, according to people who've already retired
A recent study by U.S. researchers has found that retirees enjoy retirement by spending on leisure and other activities that keep them socially engaged, according to this article from Money. Happy retirees also pursue activities that improve their relationships with their spouses and loved ones, the study found. They also live an active lifestyle to stay fit and healthy.