In my role as a coach to financial advisors and wholesalers, one of my goals is to help team leaders across all the major channels understand how to build better and more efficient teams. During our sessions, someone inevitably asks me what I think of personality assessments—the DISC, the Kolbe, the Myers-Briggs, or another test designed to sort out and label personality attributes.

These tests, and the consultants who provide them, seek to ensure that current and future team members will get along. A lot of time, effort, and money is spent on discovering if a prospective team member will "fit" and determining if a new member's personality or behavior will be complementary to those already on the team.

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